5 Habits for Success in 2023

C.L. Reece
7 min readDec 29, 2022

Coming up with New Year’s resolutions can be overwhelming, especially if you have a history of falling short come February. According to a 2009 study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, forming a new habit takes 18 to 254 days, and behavior takes an average of 66 days to become automatic. This means if you started working towards your resolutions on January 1st, 2023, your earliest possible habit would not form until January 19th, and would not become automatic until March 8th, if not later, as some harder habits could take up until September 12th.

While many people feel motivated the day after the holiday season to accomplish goals, such as losing weight, going on a dream trip to Europe, or going back to school, most only end up achieving one or two goals by the end of the year. Often, we fail to realize that we struggle not to accomplish the goals themselves, but rather the small daily habits and routines that we don’t implement. Establishing daily habits can be incredibly beneficial, and there are five simple habits you can begin with in 2023 to improve productivity and set the foundation for achieving big goals. After all, New Year’s resolutions are popular because studies have shown that setting clear targets and taking small steps can increase the likelihood of success.

  1. `Read More Books: Reading books is the most efficient, affordable, and engaging way to attain more knowledge. If you think about it, authors put so much time and effort into their craft and finished product, distilling years of research, life experience, and insight on pages you can read in a matter of days. Make it a point to read more in 2023, and if reading is not your preference, audiobooks are available too. More frequent cognitive activity across the lifespan has an association with slower late-life cognitive decline that is independent of common neuropathologic conditions, consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis. Getting lost in a good read can make it easier for you to relate to others. Literary fiction, specifically, has the power to help its readers understand what others are thinking by reading others’ emotions, according to research published in Science. The impact is much more significant on those who read literary fiction as opposed to those who read nonfiction. According to a recent study by the University of Toronto, 166 people were…

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C.L. Reece

Freelance Writer, History, True Crime and Unsolved Mysteries, Educator, Doctorate in Education, Follow me on instagram @piecesofclreece